Wednesday, March 28, 2012

YA Highway: Road Trip Wednesday #13


"Road Trip Wednesday is a ‘Blog Carnival,’ where YA Highway's contributors post a weekly writing- or reading-related question that begs to be answered. In the comments, you can hop from destination to destination and get everybody's unique take on the topic." Today's question on the YA Highway Road Trip is:
This Week's Topic:
What was the best book you read in March? 

(source)
I am completely in love with my favorite book read for March. Anna Sheehan's A LONG, LONG SLEEP was so amazing. It got mixed reviews, which really surprised me, because I think it transcends the dystopian genre to powerfully examine issues of identity and abuse. The dystopian setting was just that--a setting.

The device of Anna being placed in stasis was used not as an example of how the entire world was screwed up, but how technology can be used in the service of child abuse. Anna's experiences are timeless, and Sheehan effectively uses the idea of stasis to retell the Sleeping Beauty fairy tale. Just when I was getting sick of reading dystopian novels about fighting factions, A LONG, LONG SLEEP reminded me that there are incredible novels out there that while dystopian, focus more intimately on their characters.

P.S. Which cover do you prefer? I like the one on the left best, but I think that's because I usually prefer covers which aren't "portraits." For a portrait, the one on the right is quite pretty!

12 comments:

  1. I haven't heard of this! My TBR list is growing so much today! I think the cover on the right is more haunting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She does have frightened eyes, I'll give you that. It's so good!

      Delete
  2. Hmm, that sounds good! I think you're right that dystopias often feature the new world so heavily that they don't have as much time to go in-depth on their characters. Character-driven stories are always my favorites.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, I agree. I'm also probably exaggerating slightly, in that there are lots of dystopian novels with well developed characters. But a lot of times it feels like that development occurs through a character's interaction with their setting. Even though Rose is adrift in a new world, her development occurs through acknowledging and understanding issues in her past, so the setting is less important.

      Delete
  3. Ooh, i will have to add ALONG LONG SLEEP to my to-read list! By the way, I have awarded you the Versatile Blogger Award because you have a lovely blog here. Details are on my blog :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Lora, I really appreciate it!

      Delete
  4. I loved this one! Such a refreshing surprise--a passive heroine who made sense!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! The psychological underpinnings are so solid. As I was falling asleep the other night, I was thinking that there are some parallels between passive heroines in fantasy novels and the old "virtue" novels like Pamela, Clarissa, Charlotte Temple, etc. But the parallels have been lost in a sleepy fog. I'm really hoping I remember them!

      Delete
  5. It sounds like a great read! I have to add it to my TBR (and I also like the cover of the left better than the one on the right!)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm much more enthusiastic about this book than I have been about any YA in a while!

      Delete
  6. This looks really interesting! I might have to pick it up. I agree about the cover. The problem with portraits, for me, is that hairstyles and clothing and general portrait style are completely subject to the whims of fashion. In five years, the right-hand cover might look completely out of date; the left-hand one is more timeless.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, datedness is such a good point, especially for YA covers.

      Delete